The sighting of a large eight foot long python snake on the yamuna river banks where the chhath puja rituals are performed by thousands of devotees caused mayhem. Wildlife SOS was contacted and the snake was rescued safely.

On the auspicious occasion of Chhath Puja(an ancient Hindu festival)when thousands of devotees pay homage to the Sun God at the banks of River Yamuna in Delhi, a commotion was caused by the sighting of a very large eight foot python. Wildlife SOS runs a 24×7 helpline to help mitigate human wildlife conflict was contacted on its 9871963535.A specialist Wildlife SOS rescue team was deployed, who rushed to the location and safely removed the giant reptile.

The Delhi police contacted the Wildlife SOS helpline informing them about a large python sighted on the bank of Yamuna. The Wildlife SOS rescue team was escorted by the Delhi police to the location where the snake was sighted. The Wildlife SOS team observed that the python had sustained some injuries which could have been caused due to stoning by onlookers. The team then gently lifted the heavy python, while carefully guiding it into a snake bag that is carried by the team on rescue operations. These bags allow snakes to breathe and be contained while ensuring they can be transported safely.

Other Wildlife SOS team members and the Police advised the onlookers to maintain calm while sensitizing them about the non-venomous nature of pythons.

Kartick Satyanarayan, Wildlife SOS Co-founder said, “Pythons are very often mistaken to be dangerous because of their size and the mythical rumors. I appreciate the effort taken by the Delhi Police to contact Wildlife SOS and helping us maintain peace and calm at the location throughout the rescue operation”

The python is currently under medical rehabilitation and will be released back into its natural habitat once its injuries are healed and the animal is certified fit for release by Wildlife SOS.

“Pythons are feared by many people who tend to kill them mistaking them to be venomous. They are an endangered species and protected under the Wildlife Protection act 1972,” said Geeta Seshmani, Co-Founder, Wildlife SOS.